Inventory of the Lear-Potter Papers

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Overview of the Collection

Scope and Contents of the Collection

Restrictions

Index Terms

Administrative Information

Detailed Description of the Collection


Overview of the Collection

Creator: Lear, Linda
Title: Lear-Potter Papers
Abstract: Photocopied correspondence, documents, photographs, artwork, notes, and secondary source material assembled for the biography Beatrix Potter: A Life in Nature by Linda Lear.

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Scope and Contents of the Collection

The archival collection consists of approximately twenty linear feet of copied correspondence, documents, photographs, artwork, notes, and secondary source material assembled for the biography Beatrix Potter: A Life in Nature by Linda Lear.

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Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

Materials marked with an asterisk (*) are restricted to researchers until attaining permission of the original document's owner. Please contact the Director of Special Collections at the Lear Center prior to your visit if you wish to use these items.

Restrictions on Use

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Index Terms

This collection is indexed under the following headings at the Charles E. Shain Library. Researchers desiring materials about related topics, persons or places should search the catalog using these headings.
Persons:
Potter, Beatrix, 1866-1943
Potter, Rupert William, 1832-1914
Organizations:
Frederick Warne & Company
National Trust
Girl Guides
Places:
London
Lake District (England)
Subjects:
Children's literature and illustration
Unitarianism
Land conservation
Document Types:
Correspondence
Manuscripts
Photographs
Notes

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Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

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Detailed Description of the Collection

The following section contains a brief listing of the materials in the collection with links to folder-level descriptions. A complete finding aid (70 pages) may also be downloaded.

Series 1: Chapter Research Materials
Contains items used in the preparation of the prologue, 21 chapters, and epilogue.  The series includes notes, chronologies, correspondence, newspaper and journal articles, book excerpts, legal documents, interviews and memoirs, maps, photographs, and copies of Beatrix Potter’s writings and artwork. 

Box
0 Prologue, “Ownership”—Beatrix Potter’s purchase of Hill Top Farm, Castle Farm, and other properties in the Lake District, including deeds and maps
1A/1B Chapter 1, “Roots”—the history of the Potter, Leech, and Crompton families and their roots in Dinting Vale and Stalybridge; Unitarianism and the Potters’ Unitarian affiliations and friends, including William Gaskell; Edmund Potter’s writings and calico manufacturing; Rupert Potter’s education, career, and marriage to Helen Leech; Bolton Gardens, the Potter home in London; obituaries and wills of Potter and Leech family members
2A/2B Chapter 2, “Exposures”—Potter family holidays at Dalguise House in Scotland; art and literary influences on Beatrix Potter; children’s books; women writers; Beatrix Potter’s early drawings; neighbors and friends of the Potters, including John Bright, John Charles Wilson, and Sir John Everett Millais
3A/3B Chapter 3, “Transitions”—Beatrix Potter’s journal for 1881 through 1889; Leslie Linder’s transcription of Beatrix Potter’s journal; Potter family holidays at Wray Castle and in Ilfracombe and Scotland; Beatrix Potter’s governesses and Bertram Potter’s schools and clubs; the death of Edmund Potter; Rupert Potter’s photography; Rupert Potter and Sir John Everett Millais
4A/4B Chapter 4, “Experiments”—Beatrix Potter’s journal for 1890 through 1895; Potter family holidays in Scotland; natural history influences on Beatrix Potter; Charles Macintosh; Beatrix Potter’s early fungi, archeological, and fossil drawings; the sale of Beatrix Potter drawings to Ernest Nister; the first Peter Rabbit picture letter; Caroline Hutton; Caroline Martineau; the Woodward family
5 Chapter 5, “Discoveries”—Beatrix Potter’s journal and correspondence for 1896 and 1897; Beatrix Potter’s drawings and photographs of fungi, spore germination, mosses, archeological stones, and fossils; Charles Macintosh correspondence; Mary Noble correspondence; Kew Gardens; Sir Henry Enfield Roscoe; Henry Marshall Ward; Beatrix Potter’s lost Linnean Society paper on fungi; Beatrix Potter and the scientific community
6A/6B/
6C
Chapter 6, “Fantasies”—Beatrix Potter’s journal for 1897; Beatrix Potter’s correspondence for 1897 through 1903; Beatrix Potter’s picture letters;  Beatrix Potter’s little books; Frederick Warne & Company; The Tale of Peter Rabbit; Hardwicke Rawnsley; conservation and the National Trust; Leslie Brooke; children’s books and animal stories; catalogs, exhibitions, and criticism of Beatrix Potter’s little books
7 Chapter 7, “Ideas”—Beatrix Potter’s correspondence for 1903; The Tale of Squirrel Nutkin; The Tailor of Gloucester; copyright and piracies of The Tale of Peter Rabbit
8 Chapter 8, "Realities"—Beatrix Potter's correspondence for 1904 and 1905; the Warne family; The Tale of Two Bad Mice; The Tale of Benjamin Bunny; The Tale of Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle; Beatrix Potter's Derwentwater sketchbook
9 Chapter 9, “Losses”—Beatrix Potter’s correspondence for 1905; The Tale of the Pie and the Patty-pan; Norman Warne; Beatrix Potter and Norman Warne’s romance; Beatrix Potter’s 1905 holiday diary; Norman Warne’s illness and death
10 Chapter 10, “Stories”—Beatrix Potter’s correspondence for 1906 through 1909; The Tale of Mr. Jeremy Fisher; The Tale of Tom Kitten; The Tale of Jemima Puddle-Duck; The Roly-Poly Pudding; The Tale of the Flopsy Bunnies; The Tale of Ginger and Pickles
11 Chapter 11, “Diversions”—Beatrix Potter’s correspondence for 1910 through 1912; Beatrix Potter’s work for the campaign against free trade; Beatrix Potter’s letter-writing campaign against hydroplanes on Windermere; The Tale of Mrs. Tittlemouse; The Tale of Timmy Tiptoes; Peter Rabbit’s Painting Book; The Tale of Mr. Tod; Beatrix Potter’s fairytales
12 Chapter 12, “Satisfactions”—Beatrix Potter’s correspondence for 1913; The Tale of Pigling Bland; William Heelis; Beatrix Potter and William Heelis’s marriage
13 Chapter 13, “Partnerships”—Beatrix Potter’s correspondence for 1913 through 1916; the death of Rupert Potter; the death of Sir Henry Enfield Roscoe; Beatrix Potter’s friendship with Eleanor Louisa (Louie) Choyce; Frederic Fowkes and the Landowner’s Community Association; women and farming during the First World War; Moss Heckle Tarn
14 Chapter 14, “Salvages”—Beatrix Potter’s correspondence for 1917 and 1918; Harold Warne’s arrest; Appley Dapply’s Nursery Rhymes; The Tale of Johnny Town-Mouse; Bertram Potter’s death and estate
15A/
15B
Chapter 15, “Opportunities”—Beatrix Potter’s correspondence for 1919 through 1925; farming during the First World War; Cecily Parsley’s Nursery Rhymes; the Girl Guides; the Invalid Children’s Aid Association (ICAA); Beatrix Potter and the Armitt Library; Beatrix Potter’s first American visitors; Margaret (Daisy) Hammond; Beatrice Potter Webb; Anne Carroll Moore; Bertha Mahony Miller and the Horn Book
16A/
16B
Chapter 16, “Legacies”—Beatrix Potter’s correspondence for 1926 through 1928; Troutbeck Park Farm; Tom Storey; sheep and cattle shows; hill farming between the wars; Herdwick sheep; the Herdwick Sheep Breeders’ Association; the future of fell farming
17A/
17B
Chapter 17, “Americans”—Beatrix Potter and the Horn Book; Bertha Mahony Miller; Anne Carroll Moore; Charles S. Hopkinson; Marian Frazer Harris Perry; Elinor Whitney and William L. W. Field; Henry P. Coolidge; Alexander McKay; “Peter Rabbit’s Almanac”; The Fairy Caravan; The Tale of Little Pig Robinson; the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings (SPAB)
18A/
18B
Chapter 18, “Ventures”—Beatrix Potter’s correspondence for 1929 through 1934; Monk Coniston; Yew Tree Farm; farming at Hill Top Farm and Troutbeck Park Farm; George Walker; Joseph Moscrop; Samuel Hamer; Bruce L. Thompson; Sister Anne; Helen (Leech) Potter’s death and estate; Lakeland culture and the arts
19A/
19B
Chapter 19, “Passages”—Beatrix Potter’s correspondence for 1935 through 1938; Ivy and June Steel; Noel Moore; District Nurses and Girl Guides; Beatrix Potter’s correspondence with Josefina and H. D. (Delmar) Banner; Penny Hill Farm; the purchase of High Park and Grenfell Park;  Beatrix Potter’s friendship with Rebekah Owen
20 Chapter 20, “Challenges”—Beatrix Potter’s correspondence for 1939 through 1941; the Lake District during the Second World War; “Wag-by-Wall”; Bertha Mahony Miller; William Hyde Parker; Beatrix Potter’s illnesses and surgeries
21A/
21B
Chapter 21, “Reflections”—Beatrix Potter’s correspondence for 1942 and 1943; John Kingston Stone; Reginald and Alison Hart; “The Lonely Hills”; “The Chinese Umbrella”; fell ponies; Beatrix Potter’s interest in penicillin; Girl Guides birthday party for Beatrix Potter; Beatrix Potter as president-elect of the Herdwick Sheep Breeders’ Association; farming accounts for Hill Top Farm, Troutbeck Park Farm, and Tilberthwaite Farm; Beatrix Potter’s last letter to Joseph Moscrop; Beatrix Potter’s death and cremation
22 Epilogue, “Stewardship”—Beatrix Potter’s death certificate, will, and estate documents; royalty statements; the death of William Heelis; the schedule of Beatrix Potter properties conveyed to the National Trust; Beatrix Potter’s legacy and farming in the Lake District

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Series 2: Beatrix Potter, A Life in Nature, Original Version and Publication
Contains notes, outlines, chronologies, correspondence, and the original chapter drafts of the book, as well as the book proposal, permissions to publish, and publication notices and reviews.

Box
23A/23B/
23C
Proposal; notes, chronologies, drafts; comments; correspondence; notices and reviews.

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Series 3: Related Research Materials
Contains legal documents, obituaries, brochures, exhibition catalogs, newspaper and journal articles, correspondence, memoirs, interviews, photographs and thumbnail images, visual and audio materials, maps, cards and a scrapbook.

Box
24 Legal documents and obituaries; family life; homes; family photographs
25 Photographs; art sales and exhibits; Beatrix Potter writings; picture letters
26 Unitarianism; biographical information
27 Memoirs, interviews, biographical works on Beatrix Potter
28 Children's literature and Beatrix Potter
29 Lake District; Beatrix Potter as a natural historian; environmental history; women, class, and society in Victorian England
30A/
30B
Libraries, archives, and museums
31 Visual and audio materials
32/33 Correspondence to Linda Lear regarding Beatrix Potter
34 Linda Lear lectures and articles regarding Beatrix Potter
35 Barbara Collier materials
Over-
size
Maps

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